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Learn about Languid Loreto

Declared a Pueblo Mágico by the Mexican government in 2012, Loreto is a pretty, relaxing coastal town of barely 10,000 people, which despite its small size offers plenty for visitors, whether on land or sea. Its main claim to fame however is historical...


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Loreto was the first capital of the Californias. Despite several earlier attempts, including those of Hernan Cortés himself, Loreto was the first permanent Spanish settlement established in the Californias It held the title of capital until 1777, by which time Spanish settlement had extended far into Alta California and administrative responsibility was switched to Monterey in what is now California, USA.


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Loreto has a mission founded in the 17th century, plus a mission museum. Loreto was founded by Jesuits, and so Christian worship was established immediately, though the mission building itself wasn't completed until the mid 18th century. Next door to "Misión Nuestra Señora de Loreto Conchó" is the museum, which traces the history of the colonisation of the Californias.


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The Malecón. Walk from the mission, down Paseo Salvatierra and past the "Palacio Municipal" and you'll soon reach the seafront Malecón, a fine place for a leisurely stroll. A block south is the excellent Los Mandiles restaurant. At its northern end you'll find a small sandy beach and nearby the marina, the starting point for many a fishing trip or other aquatic activity. Opposite you will be Isla Carmen, the largest of the islands in the bay, and to the north east is Isla Coronados, the most popular to visit.


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Loreto Bay is the largest marine reserve in Mexico. Just over 2000 square kilometres of the Sea of Cortés was declared a conservation area in 1996. Notable species include several types of whale and dolphin, sea lions and turtles. Activities for humans include fishing, diving, kayaking and boat tours of the bay.


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The Sierra de la Giganta provides dramatic scenery to the west. Back on dry land, the Sierra de la Giganta forms the backbone of this part of the peninsula and contains its own historical attractions - 35km from Loreto San Javier has a moorish style mission which can easily be visited and nearby cave paintings. Whale watching trips to Bahía Magdalena (150 kms away on the Pacific coast) are also on offer.

You can spend two nights in Loreto with us as part of our Baja tour. Our Loreto layover includes a boat trip into the bay and plenty of free time to explore the rest of what this historical town has to offer. Click for itineraries, dates and prices.

Declared a "Pueblo Magico" by the Mexican government in 2012, Loreto is a pretty, relaxing coastal town of barely

10,000 people, which despite its small size offers plenty for visitors, whether on land or sea. Its main claim to

fame however is historical...

Loreto was the first capital of the Californias. Despite several earlier attempts, including those of Hernan

Cortés himself, Loreto was the first permanent Spanish settlement established in the Californias, and held the

title of capital until 1777, by which time Spanish settlement had extended far into Alta California and

administrative responsibility was switched to Monterey in what is now California, USA.

Loreto has a mission founded in the 17th century, plus a mission museum. Loreto was founded by Jesuits, and so

Christian worship was established immediately, though the mission building itself wasn't completed until the mid

18th century. Next door to "Misión Nuestra Señora de Loreto Conchó" is the museum, which traces the history of

the colonisation of the Californias.

The Malecón. Walk from the mission, down Paseo Salvatierra and past the "Palacio Municipal" and you'll soon reach

the seafront Malecón, a fine place for a leisurely stroll. A block south is the excellent "Los Mandiles"

restaurant. At its northern end you'll find a small sandy beach and nearby the marina, the starting point for

many a fishing trip or other aquatic activity. Opposite you will be Isla Carmen, the largest of the islands in

the bay, and to the north east is Isla Coronados, the most popular to visit.

Loreto Bay is the largest marine reserve in Mexico. Just over 2000 square kilometres of the Sea of Cortés was

declared a conservation area in 1996. Notable species include several types of whale and dolphin, sea lions and

turtles. Activities for humans include fishing, diving, kayaking and boat tours of the bay.

The Sierra de la Giganta provides dramatic scenery to the west. Back on dry land, the Sierra de la Giganta forms

the backbone of this part of the peninsula and contains its own historical attractions - 35km from Loreto San

Javier has a moorish style mission which can easily be visited and nearby cave paintings. Whale watching trips to

Bahía Magdalena (150 kms away on the Pacific coast) are also on offer.

You can spend two nights in Loreto with us as part of our Baja tour. Our Loreto layover includes a boat trip into

the bay and a trip to San Javier to see the mission and cave paintings, as well as plenty of free time to explore

the rest of what this historical town has to offer. Click for itineraries, dates and prices.