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Thursday, 13 December 2012 18:14

Revolution on "La Revo"?

Written by  Ian Wright

Tijuana's Revival: Part Three

Much has been written about Tijuana's sleazy reputation (not least on this blog), and it is on Avenida Revolución ("La Revo") and surrounding streets that this reputation was largely built. What then of the reality of the situation, in light of the revival going on elsewhere in the city? We decided to take a look for ourselves...
1-tijuana- street-art12-tijuana- street-art23-tijuana- street-art3

An admission first of all: perhaps a cloudy Sunday lunchtime wasn't the best time to evaluate, but the rain after a busy day the night before had put paid to our original plans, so we got there when we could! Nevertheless, as the pictures show, we could get a reasonable idea of the state of things there. The slump in Tijuana's traditional tourist trade was plain to see, with a number of properties boarded up. This has been turned into an opportunity by many of the city's young street artists, and many empty shop fronts have been decorated with vibrant and colourful street art.
4-tijuana- fleamarket15-tijuana- fleamarket26-tijuana- fleamarket3
That's not to say that the place is a ghost town, with the usual selection of pharmacies, gaudy gift shops and market stalls open to trade with the few people around. Norma and Aurora had a look around a flea market selling decorative (family-friendly!) household ornaments.
7-tijuana- street-art48-tijuana-drhouse9-tijuana-arch
Outside on the main drag larger retail outlets were either closed or doing little business. "Sex Shop in the City" and a pharmacy called "Dr House" particularly caught my eye!
10-tijuana-sexshopinthecity11-tijuana-zonkey112-tijuana-zonkey2
The donkeys, infamously painted to look like zebras ("zonkeys") are still there, though few were being troubled by the presence of too many tourists.
13-tijuana-jai-alai14-tijuana-jai-alai-ian15-tijuana-caesars
Two of TJ's more respectable landmarks are still going strong: the Frontón Jai Alai, opened in 1947 to house the basque ball game of the same name, is an interesting building worthy of a visit, whether or not it is hosting an event. Finally, there is Caesar's, home of Tijuana's historical claim to culinary fame, the Caesar Salad. Now it is in the safe hands of the Plascencia family, amongst the leading lights in the gastronomic revolution in the north of the peninsula. If this revolution gets to reach Avenida Revolución it will be exceptionally good news for Tijuana and its visitors. On this occasion, however, we had a prior arrangement to dine elsewhere, the subject of my next post.

Revolution on "La Revo"?

Much has been written about Tijuana's sleazy reputation (not least on this blog), and it is on Avenida Revolución

("La Revo") and surrounding streets that this reputation was largely built. What then of the reality of the

situation, in light of the revival going on elsewhere in the city? We decided to take a look for ourselves...

An admission first of all: perhaps a cloudy Sunday lunchtime wasn't the best time to evaluate, but the rain after a

busy day the night before had put paid to our original plans, so we got there when we could! Nevertheless, as the

pictures show, we could get a reasonable idea of the state of things there. The slump in Tijuana's traditional

tourist trade was plain to see, with a number of properties boarded up. This has been turned into an opportunity by

many of the city's young street artists, and many empty shop fronts have been decorated with vibrant and colourful

street art.

That's not to say that the place is a ghost town, with the usual selection of pharmacies, gaudy gift shops and

market stalls open to trade with the few people around. Norma and Aurora had a look around a flea market selling

decorative (family-friendly!) household ornaments.

Outside on the main drag larger retail outlets were either closed or doing little business. "Sex Shop in the City"

and a pharmacy called "Dr House" particularly caught my eye!

The donkeys, infamously painted to look like zebras ("zonkeys") are still there, though few were being troubled by

the presence of too many tourists.

Two of TJ's more respectable landmarks are still going strong: the Frontón Jai Alai, opened in 1947 to house the

basque ball game of the same name, is an interesting building worthy of a visit, whether or not it is hosting an

event. Finally, there is Caesar's, home of Tijuana's historical claim to culinary fame, the Caesar Salad. Now it is

in the safe hands of the Plascencia family, amongst the leading lights in the gastronomic revolution in the north of

the peninsula. If this revolution gets to reach Avenida Revolución it will be exceptionally good news for Tijuana

and its visitors. On this occasion, however, we had a prior arrangement to dine elsewhere, the subject of my next

post.
Read 20514 times Last modified on Friday, 28 December 2012 19:13

1 comment

  • Comment Link Jim Thursday, 13 December 2012 19:47 posted by Jim

    Been a long time I have been there. Sorry that business has died off so much. This was once a very busy place.

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